Canada Pension Plan (CPP) for the self-employed 2012

If you are self-employed, you have to pay Canada Pension Plan (CPP) contribution based on your net profit (after expenses). 

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CPP Rates and maximums 1997 - 2005

The following table shows the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) contribution rates, maximums and exemptions from 1997 to 2005 (click here for current rates and maximums):

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CPP Rates and maximums 2013

The Canada Pension Plan (CPP) rate and exemption remains the same in 2013. But the maximum pensionable earnings increase $1,000 to $51,100 in 2013 from $50,100. As a result, the employees who earn $51,100 or more will have to make $49.50 more in CPP contribution compared to 2012. Employers will also see their CPP expenses to increase $49.50 for each employee whose salary is $51,100 or higher (click here for current rates and maximums)

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EI Rates and maximums 1997 - 2005

The following taxable shows a employment insurance (EI) premium rates and maximums from 1997 to 2006 (click here for current EI rates and maximums).

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Changes to EI rates and maximums in 2013

The employment insurance (EI) rates increase to 1.88% in 2013 from 1.83%. The maximum insurable earnings increase $1,500 to $47,400. The employees earning $47,400 or more will have to contribute $51.15 more compared to 2012. The employers will have to spend $71.61 more on EI premium for each employees with salary of $47,400 or higher. The EI rate in Quebec increased to 1.52% in 2013 from 1.47% in 2012.

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Additional information